Silence and the beat 0 issue

When the first note of a particular stepfile occurs at the beginning of the very first beat in the file, it's not necessarily on sync. The ThirdStyle engine uses the first beat of the file as a corrector to be sure it has the right scroll rate for the particular beginning section of the file, which means you might see a visual shift in this first arrow as the change takes place. You might describe it as a hiccup or skip depending on your amod.

Examples of files where this can become an annoyance --

Cha-Cha Moderne: 20 second intro before the song even starts, and then a potential great on the first note.
Pork Cylinders: 13 second intro with a second visible note that's very easy to great as well.
Tricky's Song: File and song both start at the same time, but this happening interrupts SP grinding.

How can you fix it? Move back your offset so it's a beat early, then copy your arrows down a beat. You can get a new offset mathematically by getting out a calculator program or typing straight into Wolfram|Alpha. Just get the time at the second beat and subtract it from the time at the first beat. Then take that result and subtract it from the time of the first beat. For higher bpm songs (300+), consider doing this twice.

Example -- I have an offset of 2.235, and my second beat is at 2.715. 2.715 - 2.235 = 0.480, which is the distance between the beats. Then 2.235 - 0.480 = 1.755, the new offset.
isk;16074 said:
One other note, the syncing occurs after at least 100 ms into the mp3.
Sometimes, though, the offset is so close to the beginning of the mp3 that it can't actually be moved back a beat. This is where adding silence to the song comes in handy, and I'm thankful for the steppers that already do this when necessary. Here's a tutorial on how to do it in Audacity for those who might be new to this:

Load up an mp3 in Audacity and wait until the waveform appears. Use the magnifying glass (or the key command Ctrl 1) to zoom in on the beginning of the mp3, and click in the space before the first waves appear. Then find the command to generate silence, which is aptly Generate -> Silence:

image

Click on Silence and you'll get this window:

image

Change whatever number is in the box to something low. It defaults to 30 seconds, which is extremely unnecessary. And yes, for some reason this works to 6 decimal places. Then click Generate Silence and it will add in the silence for you.

Use File -> Export As MP3 to create an mp3 with the silence on it, and name it something different than the original mp3 to avoid problems. On your first export, Audacity will ask "Where is lame_enc.dll?" in which case you should follow the directions listed here to get it and export successfully.

Hopefully this made some kind of sense, and thanks for reading!

Comments

  • iskisk BADministrator
    edited January 2012
    It should be noted that re-compressing an MP3 will degrade quality, so if it must be done try finding a high quality source. Alternatively, there is mp3DirectCut, which can edit the mp3 without decompressing. I've never tried this, but it may be a better option. If it doesn't already include an insert silence option, it would be easy to find or generate a silent mp3 and copy/insert from that.

    One other note, the syncing occurs after at least 100 ms into the mp3.
  • kislerkisler Publisher
    edited January 2012
    Ah, yes...I would mention to dig around in the preferences to increase the export quality so you don't lose as much, but its default is good enough here.

    Edited that note into the OP, thanks.
  • SkRAWRkSkRAWRk Simfiler
    edited January 2012
    I'm not sure the silence being added is precise as it should be, or I think there's some discrepancy caused when you export it. When I first made Origin, I added 2 seconds silence and adjusted the offset by 2 seconds exactly, but it ended up 13 milliseconds off or something. D:
  • kislerkisler Publisher
    edited February 2012
    Bump. "No beat 0 issue" is now a requirement for simfile submission.
  • RubberChickinRubberChickin Simfiler
    edited March 2012
    With Audacity you can change the rate of compression when you are saving the file. I believe the rate goes up to 320 kbps so you shouldn't lose too much quality.
  • kislerkisler Publisher
    edited March 2012
    RubberChickin;18726 said:
    With Audacity you can change the rate of compression when you are saving the file. I believe the rate goes up to 320 kbps so you shouldn't lose too much quality.
    So here's an issue I recently found - what if the mp3 quality is low to begin with? The only available version of this particular song is 192kb/s, and a cut will decrease that even more. (No matter the compression rate, there is always, always a quality loss). 192 is passable, but it sounds pretty rough.
  • Preety rough it says.
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